Samuel James

Singer. Songwriter. Guitarist. Raconteur.

Press

 
 

Quotes

"... These tracks explore... the shared spaces by James first performing the song solo, then performing it with a full band (and by "band," he means just him -- her played all 24 instruments that appear on the album). This is a deeply personal, rich narrative, an introspective but aware art project about our contemporary American experience that feels, right now, very vital to our cultural dialogue."

-Dispatch Magazine (reviewing Already Home Recordings Volume 1)

 

"If you listen to Samuel James’ Nineteen, you’ll think you’re listening to some straight-up early 20th century delta blues. But make no mistake. This man sings the blues with an earthy, wooden tone that connects you with his memories unmistakably. His prowess with the slide guitar also shines, and his percussive elements make him a one man band that you’d be remiss to miss."

-Portland Phoenix
 

"... He is like no one else on the planet. A powerful performer and a spirited instrumentalist."

-thecountryblues.com

"Samuel James [...] Guardian of lightning."

— Rolling Stone France

 

"Samuel James is Keb' Mo' on steroids!"

— Oracles Music Network

 

"All muscles, model good looks, tattoos, and sepia-tinted pouting... if the Wu Tang Clan covered Robert Johnson it may sound a bit like this."

— Americana UK

 

"Down-to-earth tales that speak volumes, and intimate arrangements that suck you in so far you forget just how hard you are listening."

— www.popmatters.com

 

"[S]o much energy for each pick, slide, strum and foot stomp that it seems impossible for one man to accomplish"

— What's Up! Magazine

 

"Samuel James is as enigmatic as they come. James, if you don’t know, is a Portland-based composer, musician, and storyteller in the folk, roots, and blues traditions. But that description feels incomplete. Let’s contemplate his latest project, Already Home Recordings Volume 1. On this short, fascinating album (the other three volumes are slated for release over the course of a year), James offers up one original composition and two traditionals, each one done “two ways,” as a response to discovering that his family lineage, rich with musicians, boasts artists both of the African-American folk tradition as well as the white-American folk tradition. These tracks explore that duality as well as the shared spaces by James first performing the song solo, then performing it with a full band (and by "band," he means just him -- he played all 24 instruments that appear on the album). This is a deeply personal, rich narrative, an introspective but aware art project about our contemporary American experience that feels, right now, very vital to our cultural dialogue."

-Dispatch Magazine